Pricing on your Website?

Pricing on Your Website?
 

Fall is one of the busiest booking seasons in the wedding industry. If your inquiries aren't where you want them, it may be because you're missing the mark on your website.  

So should you put pricing on your website? The short answer is yes – but don’t put all of your pricing. The more information you put on your site – pricing or otherwise – the fewer inquiries you will get. Inquiry means to ask about, so if you provide more information on the website you’ll have fewer people asking questions directly to you. 
 
I recommend putting three things about pricing on your site

  1. How you charge. If you’re a planner, tell them you charge a flat fee or percentage, or hourly. If you’re a photographer, tell them you charge for services arranged in a package or collection. If you're a venue, what's included in the site fee. And so on.

  2. Why you charge this way. When you tell them how you charge, let them know why you do it this way. If you’re that planner who charges a flat fee, tell them you charge a flat fee because you think charging a percentage incentivizes planners to spend more of the client’s money. Turn it into a distinction of your services compared to others’.

  3. Starting at price. Let visitors know your lowest prices so they can determine if you’re even a possibility for them to consider. This saves everyone time. It also gives you the opportunity to focus on the prospect’s needs and your services in the early stages of the inquiry process, rather than get sidetracked by pricing too early.

You want people to see pricing information next to other helpful areas on your website. I recommend putting the hows and whys and starting price on the traditional “about” page or “services” page, not a page devoted directly to pricing (and avoid the term "investment" altogether). Again, don't sidetrack them with too much about pricing so early in the buyer's journey!

Keep an open mind to new ways of talking about pricing and remember that you've got to keep playing with your approach until it's fine-tuned to deliver the best results. Make a best-first-guess, get feedback, modify, and repeat.